Did you know that women in Manhattan are less likely to date off the island than men?
Would it surprise you to know that Brooklynites are the least willing to travel for a date?

These findings are the results of a recent survey of New York singles regarding their inter-borough dating habits. The data, some of which was featured in the

Leah, in Brooklyn, whose dating-distance range includes her own neighborhood as well as Manhattan and Queens, has found a practical solution to the problem of inter-borough relationships:

“I’m dating someone who lives in the west 140s in Harlem and I’m in Williamsburg. It’s really not that big a deal, only a 45-60 minute trip. And we both work in Manhattan, so it’s equally convenient to go to one of our places after work (and to go back to work the next day). Plus we keep some essentials at the other person’s apartment (toothbrush, spare socks and underwear). But after working in the Bronx temporarily and having a minimum 1.5-hour commute each way (three subways and a bus!), I don’t think I could date someone that far. Maybe if I had a car, but no way if I’m dependent on the MTA.”

MOST DESIRED AREAS

The graph below shows the most popular Boroughs outsides someone’s home territory.

• For example, 90% of people not living in Manhattan are willing to date someone who lives
there, while only 10% of people not from SI are willing to date someone who lives in SI.
Erica, who is moving to Manhattan from Brooklyn, is convinced that this will limit her options:

“I’m moving from Brooklyn to Manhattan in less than a month, and this will absolutely narrow down my acceptable dating-commuter distance to Manhattan only. Neighborhood dating is just so much easier… and at the very least, shouldn’t cost more than 10 bucks in cab fare to get home at the end of the night (assuming home is where I’m going).”

To make a general observation about these findings, it seems that the closer that people feel that they are to “the heart of the city,” the less likely they are to be willing to travel for love. If singles who live in Brooklyn and Manhattan consider themselves to be “where it’s at,” why would they leave?

Limiting your romantic prospects to people in your immediate radius, however, might not be the wisest choice. What if Mr. or Mrs. Right lives in Staten Island? Are you going to let true love pass you by because of a longer commute?

What do you think? Tell us in the comments.

[WSJ]

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